“The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke #TOC #museums #technology #design #digitalization #interactivity

Announcement, Books, exhibitions, interaction, interactivity, interactivity, museums, Museums, Technology, Technology, visitors

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation #technology 

The publication of “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke has been announced for November 15th, 2019. The book includes interviews by Seb Chan (ACMI), Dave Patten (Science Museum London), Rory Hyde (Victoria & Albert Museum, London), and Keir Winesmith (SFMOMA) as well as chapters covering four broad themes: “THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR”, “ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE”, “DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE”, and “LOCATING IN PLACE”.

More information about the Handbook can be accessed on the publisher’s website by clicking the image below (apologies for the steep price!).

41Au7tyvoTL GLAM 

New Practices in Digital Media design in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Steven Cooke, Dirk vom Lehn
 

FRAMING INTERVIEWS

Interview with Seb Chan, ACMI Seb Chan, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
Interview with Dave Patten, Science Museum London David Patten, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Rory Hyde, V&A Museum Rory Hyde, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Keir Winesmith, SFMOMA Keir Winesmith, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
 

PART 1. THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR

Digitizations, users and curatorial agency within complex global machinic jurisdictions Fiona Cameron
The distributed museum: the flight of cultural authority and the multiple times and spaces of the art museum Andrew Dewdney
The distributed museum is already here–it’s just not very evenly distributed Ed Rodley
Speculative Collections and the Emancipatory Library Bethany Nowviskie
Chinese Museums’ Digital Heritage Profile: An Evaluation of Digital Technology Adoption in Cultural Heritage Institutions Andrew White and Eugene Ch’ng
Hacking heritage: understanding the limits of online access Tim Sherratt
From Planned Oblivion to Digital Exposition: The Digital Museum of Afro-Brazilian Heritage Livio Sansone
Shared  Digital  Experiences Supporting  Collaborative    Meaning-Making  at  Heritage  Sites Sara  Perry,  Maria  Roussou,  Sophia  S.  Mirashrafi,  Akrivi  Katifori,  and  Sierra  McKinney
 

PART 2. ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE

Neither A Beginning Nor An End: Applying An Ethics of Care to Digitizing Archival Collections in South Asia Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor
Digital Archives in Africa and the Endangered Archives Programme Graeme Counsel
The Alan Vaughan-Richards Archive: recovering tropical modernism in Lagos. Ola Uduku
Museum Crowdsourcing—Detecting the Limits: eMunch.no and the Digitisation of Letters Addressed to Edvard Munch Joanna Iranowska
Digital and hybrid archives: a case study of the William J Mitchell collection Thomas Kvan, Peter Neish and Naomi Mullumby
Preserving Chinese Shadow Puppetry Culture Through Digitisation Tin-Kai Chen
Be Engaged: Facilitating Creative Re-use at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Gregory Markus, Maarten Brinkerink, Brigitte Jansen
Cultural Antinomies, Creative Complicities: Agan Harahap’s Digital Hoaxes Alexandra Moschovi and Alexander Supartono
 

PART 3. DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE

On Virtual Auras: The Cultural Heritage Object in the Age of 3D Digital Reproduction John Hindmarch, Melissa Terras and Steve Robson
Configuring Slow Technology Through Social and Embodied Interaction: Making Time for Reflection in Augmented Reality Museum Experiences with Young Visitors Areti Galani and Rachel Clarke
Exhibition Design and Professional Theories: the Development of an Astronomy Exhibition Dirk vom Lehn, Kate Sang, Richard Glassborow and Louise King
Meeting the Challenge of the Immoveable: Experiencing Mogao Grottoes Cave 45 With Immersive Technology Jeffrey Levin, Robert, Checchi, Lori Wong, Garson Yu and Edwin Baker
Immersive Engagement: Designing and Testing a Virtual Indian Residential School Exhibition Adam Muller
Hemispheres: transdisciplinary architectures and museum-university collaboration Sarah Kenderdine
Human-Centred Design in Digital Media Indigo Hanlee
Unlocking the Glass Case Peter Higgins
The law of feeling: experiments in a Yolngu museology Paul Gurrumuruway and Jennifer Deger
Henry VR: designing affect-oriented virtual reality exhibitions for art museums Paula Dredge, Anne Gerard-Austin, Simon Ives and Andrew Yip
Website as publishing platform Tim Jones and David Simpson
From Shelf to Web: First Reflections on the O’Donnell Marginalia Project Julia Kuehns
Interpreting the Future Tony Holzner
 

PART 4. LOCATING IN PLACE

What Could Have Bean? A Digital Construction of Charles Bean’s Australian War Memorial Anthea Gunn
Succession: A Generative Approach to Digital Collections Mitchell Whitelaw
Rephotography and the Situating of Then-and-Now Hannah Lewi and Andrew Murray
Hospicio Cabañas: Seeing World Heritage Through Google’s Eyes Cristina Garduno Freeman
The Experience of Using Digital Walking Tours to Explore Urban Histories Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, Hannah Lewi, Katie Best and Dora Constantinidis
Traces—Olion: Creating a Bilingual ‘Subtlemob’ for National Museum Wales Sara Huws, Alison John, Jenny Kidd
Investigating ‘Ordinary’ Landscapes: Using Visual Research Methods to Understand Heritage Digital Technologies and Sense of Place Steven Cooke and Dora Constantinidis
Massive Digital Community Archives in Colombia: An International Partnership Towards Peace Diego Merizalde and Jon Voss
Mapping an Archive of Emotions: Place, Memory and the Affective Histories of Perth’s Riverscape Alicia Marchant
 

Afterword

 

Andrea Witcomb

 

 

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation

Special Issue of Human Studies devoted to ‘Harold Garfinkel: Studies in Ethnomethodology’

Announcement, Ethnomethodology, Uncategorized

Almost exactly 2 years ago Christian Meyer and colleagues organized a conference to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of Harold Garfinkel’s Studies in Ethnomethodology. A link to information about the 2017 conference is HERE.

Human Studies has just been published Special Issue devoted to the Studies anniversary that can be accessed HERE and on the image below.

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Forthcoming “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke #museums #technology #design #digitalization #interactivity

Announcement, book, interaction, interactivity, museums, Museums, Technology

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation #technology 

The publication of “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke has been announced for November 15th, 2019. The book includes interviews by Seb Chan (ACMI), Dave Patten (Science Museum London), Rory Hyde (Victoria & Albert Museum, London), and Keir Winesmith (SFMOMA) as well as chapters covering four broad themes: “THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR”, “ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE”, “DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE”, and “LOCATING IN PLACE”.

More information about the Handbook can be accessed on the publisher’s website by clicking the image below (apologies for the steep price!).

41Au7tyvoTL

New Practices in Digital Media design in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Steven Cooke, Dirk vom Lehn
 

FRAMING INTERVIEWS

Interview with Seb Chan, ACMI Seb Chan, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
Interview with Dave Patten, Science Museum London David Patten, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Rory Hyde, V&A Museum Rory Hyde, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Keir Winesmith, SFMOMA Keir Winesmith, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
 

PART 1. THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR

Digitizations, users and curatorial agency within complex global machinic jurisdictions Fiona Cameron
The distributed museum: the flight of cultural authority and the multiple times and spaces of the art museum Andrew Dewdney
The distributed museum is already here–it’s just not very evenly distributed Ed Rodley
Speculative Collections and the Emancipatory Library Bethany Nowviskie
Chinese Museums’ Digital Heritage Profile: An Evaluation of Digital Technology Adoption in Cultural Heritage Institutions Andrew White and Eugene Ch’ng
Hacking heritage: understanding the limits of online access Tim Sherratt
From Planned Oblivion to Digital Exposition: The Digital Museum of Afro-Brazilian Heritage Livio Sansone
Shared  Digital  Experiences Supporting  Collaborative    Meaning-Making  at  Heritage  Sites Sara  Perry,  Maria  Roussou,  Sophia  S.  Mirashrafi,  Akrivi  Katifori,  and  Sierra  McKinney
 

PART 2. ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE

Neither A Beginning Nor An End: Applying An Ethics of Care to Digitizing Archival Collections in South Asia Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor
Digital Archives in Africa and the Endangered Archives Programme Graeme Counsel
The Alan Vaughan-Richards Archive: recovering tropical modernism in Lagos. Ola Uduku
Museum Crowdsourcing—Detecting the Limits: eMunch.no and the Digitisation of Letters Addressed to Edvard Munch Joanna Iranowska
Digital and hybrid archives: a case study of the William J Mitchell collection Thomas Kvan, Peter Neish and Naomi Mullumby
Preserving Chinese Shadow Puppetry Culture Through Digitisation Tin-Kai Chen
Be Engaged: Facilitating Creative Re-use at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Gregory Markus, Maarten Brinkerink, Brigitte Jansen
Cultural Antinomies, Creative Complicities: Agan Harahap’s Digital Hoaxes Alexandra Moschovi and Alexander Supartono
 

PART 3. DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE

On Virtual Auras: The Cultural Heritage Object in the Age of 3D Digital Reproduction John Hindmarch, Melissa Terras and Steve Robson
Configuring Slow Technology Through Social and Embodied Interaction: Making Time for Reflection in Augmented Reality Museum Experiences with Young Visitors Areti Galani and Rachel Clarke
Exhibition Design and Professional Theories: the Development of an Astronomy Exhibition Dirk vom Lehn, Kate Sang, Richard Glassborow and Louise King
Meeting the Challenge of the Immoveable: Experiencing Mogao Grottoes Cave 45 With Immersive Technology Jeffrey Levin, Robert, Checchi, Lori Wong, Garson Yu and Edwin Baker
Immersive Engagement: Designing and Testing a Virtual Indian Residential School Exhibition Adam Muller
Hemispheres: transdisciplinary architectures and museum-university collaboration Sarah Kenderdine
Human-Centred Design in Digital Media Indigo Hanlee
Unlocking the Glass Case Peter Higgins
The law of feeling: experiments in a Yolngu museology Paul Gurrumuruway and Jennifer Deger
Henry VR: designing affect-oriented virtual reality exhibitions for art museums Paula Dredge, Anne Gerard-Austin, Simon Ives and Andrew Yip
Website as publishing platform Tim Jones and David Simpson
From Shelf to Web: First Reflections on the O’Donnell Marginalia Project Julia Kuehns
Interpreting the Future Tony Holzner
 

PART 4. LOCATING IN PLACE

What Could Have Bean? A Digital Construction of Charles Bean’s Australian War Memorial Anthea Gunn
Succession: A Generative Approach to Digital Collections Mitchell Whitelaw
Rephotography and the Situating of Then-and-Now Hannah Lewi and Andrew Murray
Hospicio Cabañas: Seeing World Heritage Through Google’s Eyes Cristina Garduno Freeman
The Experience of Using Digital Walking Tours to Explore Urban Histories Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, Hannah Lewi, Katie Best and Dora Constantinidis
Traces—Olion: Creating a Bilingual ‘Subtlemob’ for National Museum Wales Sara Huws, Alison John, Jenny Kidd
Investigating ‘Ordinary’ Landscapes: Using Visual Research Methods to Understand Heritage Digital Technologies and Sense of Place Steven Cooke and Dora Constantinidis
Massive Digital Community Archives in Colombia: An International Partnership Towards Peace Diego Merizalde and Jon Voss
Mapping an Archive of Emotions: Place, Memory and the Affective Histories of Perth’s Riverscape Alicia Marchant
 

Afterword

 

Andrea Witcomb

 

 

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation

Just out – “Making Space for Art: A Spatial Perspective of Disruptive and Defensive Institutional Work in Venezuela’s Art World” Academy of Management Journal (AMJ) by Victoria Rodner, Thomas Roulet, Finola Kerrigan and Dirk vom Lehn

Announcement, museums, sociology

We have just published an article based on Victoria Rodner’s excellent PhD thesis in the Academy of Management Journal (AMJ). Drawing on longitudinal ethnographic and interview data the article explore how space is leveraged in institutional work, our study foregrounds the socio-political nature of space, building on and expanding the theorization of Lefebvre.

The article can be downloaded by clicking the link below:

“Making Space for Art: A Spatial Perspective of Disruptive and Defensive Institutional Work in Venezuela’s Art World”

by Victoria Rodner (@VictoriaLRodner), Thomas Roulet (@thomroulet), Finola Kerrigan (@finolak) and Dirk vom Lehn (@dirkvl)

Abstract

The physical and material aspects of space, such as geographical distance or boundaries, have social and symbolic consequences that impact how people influence and are influenced by institutions. Social actors can however contest how space is conceived, perceived and lived, thus making space a crucial lever in the disruption and defense of institutions. However, we lack understanding of the spatial aspects of such institutional struggles. In exploring how space is leveraged in institutional work, our study foregrounds the socio-political nature of space, building on and expanding the theorization of Lefebvre. We draw on an in-depth longitudinal analysis of the material, social and symbolic aspects of the spatial dimensions of disruptive and defensive institutional work over the past twenty years in Venezuela’s art world. Following the Bolivarian Revolution in the late 1990s, the incoming government transformed the organization of the national cultural landscape, resulting in a prolonged period of institutional disruption and defense. We demonstrate that actors use the material, social, and symbolic dimensions of space to challenge and maintain their key values and practices, and that those three dimensions are intertwined.

Keywords

Institutional theory, Emerging economies, Policy environment, International Management, Ethnography, Interviews

https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2016.1030

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SSSI 2019 – Thematic Panel: “Symbolic Interactionism and the Resurgent Interest in Organization and Management” #sociology #sssi #organizationstudies #management

Announcement, interaction, interactionism

At this year’s conference of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction Patrick McGinty (Western Illinois University) and I will organise a Thematic Panel titled “Symbolic Interactionism and the Resurgent Interest in Organization and Management”.

The panel has been motivated by recent publications on the influence of interactionist research on and contribution to management and organisation studies. These publication have highlighted the curious mutual disregard of interactionism and organisational analysis and management studies. This panel will bring together interactionist scholarship that over recent years has undertaken considerable efforts in bringing the debates in these areas together and pushing forward the interactionist research of management and organization, both through theorizing and research.

More details on the panel’s speakers and presentations have been published in the SSSI 2019 Programme.

 

Relevant References

Dingwall, Robert, and Phil M Strong. “The Interactional Study of Organizations.” Journal Of Contemporary Ethnography14, no. 2 (1985): 205–31.
Fine, Gary Alan. “Justifying Work: Occupational Rhetorics as Resources in Restaurant Kitchens.” Administrative Science Quarterly41, no. 1 (1996): 90–115.
Gibson, Will, and Dirk vom Lehn. Institutions, Interaction and Social Theory. Oxford: Palgrave, 2017.
Grills, Scott, and Robert Prus. “Management Motifs: An Interactionist Approach for the Study of Organizational Interchange. New York: Springer. 2018.

Harrington, Brooke. Capital without Borders : Wealth Managers and the One Percent. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016.

Hallett, Tim, and Marc Ventresca. “Inhabited Institutions: Social Interactions and Organizational Forms in Gouldner’s Patterns of Industrial Bureaucracy.” Theory and Society35, no. 2 (April 2006): 213–36. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-006-9003-z.

McGinty, Patrick J. W. “Divided and Drifting: Interactionism and the Neglect of Social Organizational Analyses in Organization Studies: The Neglect of Social Organizational Analyses.” Symbolic Interaction37, no. 2 (May 2014): 155–86. https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.101.

Norris, Dawn R. Job Loss, Identity, and Mental Health. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2016.
Sapir, Adi, and Nahoko Kameo. “Rethinking Loose Coupling of Rules and Entrepreneurial Practices among University Scientists: A Japan–Israel Comparison.” The Journal of Technology Transfer44, no. 1 (February 2019): 49–72. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10961-017-9596-6
Watson, Patrick G. “‘Common Sense Geography’ and the Elected Official: Technical Evidence and Conceptions of ‘Trust’ in Toronto’s Gardiner Expressway Decision.” Canadian Journal of Sociology43, no. 1 (March 31, 2018): 49–76. https://doi.org/10.29173/cjs27058.

New Online Course on Communication Skills in Optometry #optometry #training #communication

Announcement, experience, optometry

The College of Optometrists has recently launched a new online course on communication skills in optometry. The course, open to members of the College of Optometrists only, is aimed at newly qualified members and those returning to work. It will take participants through the stages of an eye examination and look at ways to improve communication skills. One non-interactive CET point is available and communication and standards of practice competencies are covered.

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Good communication can increase patient confidence in your knowledge and skills and result in greater patient satisfaction. It can also lead to more accurate test results and improved compliance with treatment plans. 

In this course you will cover the key stages of the eye examination:

·         meeting the patient

·         understanding patients’ concerns 

·         carrying out clinical tests 

·         delivering findings

·         ensuring patient compliance 

·         patient-centred care.

Activities are followed by hints and tips sections on open and closed questions and active listening.

This course is based on the results of research projects undertaken by King’s College London, the Institute of Education and the College of Optometrists from 2009 onwards. The projects investigated how optometrists conduct eye examinations and how their findings were communicated to patients.

Publications from the projects can be found HERE.

A description of the Knowledge Transfer Project funded by the ESRc and the College of Optometrists can be found HERE.

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CfP – ‘The Senses in Social Interaction – Symbolic Interaction Special Issue

Announcement, Call for Papers

Co-edited by Will Gibson (University College London, Institute of Education) & Dirk vom Lehn (King’s College London) 

Extended Submission Deadline: August 25th, 2019

Symbolic Interaction invites submissions for a Special Issue exploring the role of the senses in social interaction. Our particular concern is with how the senses are invoked in communicative practice in everyday life and how people make their sensorial experiences accountable to one another. The papers will mark a turning point in the study of the senses by analysing empirically senses as interactional phenomena — i.e. how people communicate about the senses; how talk, gesture, gaze, material artefacts, physical environments, and other resources are used to make the senses accountable to other participants; and how senses are made relevant and observable to unfolding interaction. We regard this approach as contrasting with existing research in the field that often looks at the ‘cultural significance’ of sensorial action or at the phenomenological experience and the meanings of sensorial action in absence of a close analysis of the interaction order in which such meanings are situated. 

Studies have begun to explore the ways that the sensorial activities figure in and configure social practices, and how they play a role in the structuring of contextually specific ‘practical relevancies’ (Mann 2018). We are particularly interested in research that develops this idea by looking at how the senses become relevant to ‘making something happen’. This ‘something’ may be in an organisational context, such as at work or in an organisationally ‘structured’ experience like visiting a gallery or going to a concert. Similarly, papers may look at more mundane contexts such as chatting, shopping, eating/drinking either in private or public spaces. A part of our interest is in exploring the methodological challenges in studying the senses (Vannini et al., 2012). In the light of this, we would be keen to publish a variety of methodological approaches from different theoretical perspectives, and to include work that uses a range of methods including observations and video methods, but also more experimental forms using contemporary modes of data representation from the arts. 

We welcome tentative expressions of interest and are happy to explore the fit of possible research papers with the above theme. Full papers should be submitted to the online system of Symbolic Interaction. Please select the tab related to this Special Issue when submitting your paper, or indicate in your cover letter that your paper is for the Special Issue. 

Deadline for submission is August 25th, 2019. Papers should not be longer than 8000 words (inclusive of references). Please follow the submission guidelines for the Symbolic Interaction journal. You will be informed by mid-October if your paper has been accepted for the Special Issue and if revisions are required to prepare the paper for publication. 

Will Gibson – w.gibson@ucl.ac.uk – Dirk vom Lehn – dirk.vom_lehn@kcl.ac.uk 

References 

Mann A (2018) Ordering tasting in a restaurant: experiencing, socializing, and processing food. The Senses and Society 13(2). 135–146. 

Vannini P, Waskul D and Gottschalk S (2013) The Senses in Self, Society, and Culture: A Sociology of the Senses (Contemporary Sociological Perspectives). Routledge.