Book Chapter with Brigitte Biehl (@doktordrama): “Atmospheres as dynamic configurations: The case of a museum and a techno club” #sociology #marketing #emca #museums #technoclub #berghain #StudioBerlin

Announcement, dramaturgical, exhibitions, experience, interaction

Brigitte Biehl and I have continued our exploration of “atmospheres” by examining how spaces and their atmospheres are dynamically produced through people’s action and interaction. Our analysis is based on studies at a museum and a techno club that due to the global pandemic was transformed into an art exhibition. The research was published in the book “The Metamorphosis of Cultural and Creative Organizations” edited by Federica De Molli and Marilena Secco.

Atmospheres as dynamic configurations: The case of a museum and a techno club by Brigitte Biehl & Dirk vom Lehn

Abstract: Organizational spaces and museum exhibitions are often designed to encompass people with a given atmosphere that encourage particular behavioural and cognitive responses. In a leisure context such as techno clubs, people are given the opportunity to have experiences that are site-specific standing in a particular a nightlife tradition. Similarly, in museums people encounter objects and artefacts displayed to allow them to have an aesthetic experience. In our chapter, we will draw on Gernot Böhme’s aesthetic theory, developing his notion of atmosphere and aesthetic work. We explore how spaces and their atmospheres are dynamically produced through people’s action and interaction. Our investigation will consider atmospheres as ongoing, as continually produced and transformed through people’s “aesthetic work”, i.e. actions, movements, and embodied interaction influenced by their moods, emotions and energy, as well as their memories and past experiences. Based on our analysis we will argue that leisure and cultural experiences arise within the spaces and atmosphere that people co-create through their presence and activities. We draw on examples from the cultural and creative industries: the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and Berghain techno club in Berlin, which during the global pandemic in 2020 was transformed into an art exhibition “Studio Berlin” in co-operation with Boros art foundation.

Table of Contents

Preface Antonio Strati 

1. Cultural and creative organizations’ space: An introduction 

Federica De Molli and Marilena Vecco 

Part I – Aesthetic 

2. Atmosphere in cultural organisations: A circumplex model of affective atmospheres 

Christian Julmi 

3. Atmospheres as dynamic configurations: The case of a museum and a techno club 

Brigitte Biehl (Biehl-Missal) and Dirk vom Lehn 

4. Creative spaces in higher education 

Tatiana Chemi

5. ‘Being t/here apart-together’: Co-creative work(ing) in bodily-digital ‘inter-places’ 

Wendelin Küpers and Stephan Sonnenburg 

Part II – Symbolic 

6. Organizational spatial transformation: The case of the un-festival 

Grant Hall and Ruth Rentschler

7. The spatial production of festivals: Ritualization, liminality and performativity 

Leonore van den Ende 

8. Artistic space: Painting and the making of space 

Eleonora Montagner and Alvise Favotto 

9. Museum spaces and changes 

Graham Black 

Part III – Instrumental 

10. Space technologies and cultural organizations 

Daniel Ericsson 

11. The regional context in entrepreneurial finance of cultural business: Urban versus rural space for creative and cultural entrepreneurship 

Elmar D. Konrad and Max Höllen 

12. Community-driven cultural spaces and the COVID-19 pandemic 

Matina Magkou, Laura Huret and Vincent Lambert

13. The expansion of virtual spaces of superstar and star museums during the COVID-19 lockdown 

Anne Gombault and Oihab Allal-Cherif 

14. Future perspectives for research on creative and cultural sectors using a spatial approach 

Federica De Molli

FQS – Debate: “Quality of Qualitative Research” #sociology #sssi #emca

Announcement, Call for Papers, quantitative/qualitative, research methods, Uncategorized

Over 20 years ago, in 2000, Franz Breuer, Jo Reichertz and Wolff-Michael Roth started a FQS debate on the “Quality of Qualitative Research.” In past contributions to this debate a wide range of issues has been discussed, such as various qualitative techniques of collecting or analyzing data, or the application of such methods within different disciplinary and institutional contexts. Since its beginning, the call for contributions to this debate has remained unchanged, while academic discussions surrounding this topic have changed substantially. The questions that were raised originally—What is “good” science? What are “good” social sciences? What is “good” qualitative social research? What are the criteria and standards for such evaluations?—are still relevant today and will continue to provide a baseline for future contributions, however, an update of the call for this FQS debate may be in order.

In the past, qualitative researchers have fought hard for acceptance and recognition of their work; this battle has largely been won. Today, in most social science disciplines (perhaps with the exception of psychology), qualitative epistemologies, theories, and methods are used and taught as “mainstream” science alongside their quantitative counterparts. Most university colleagues, students, and administrators have fully accepted their legitimacy and utility. While this is excellent news, it does not mean that debates about the “quality” of qualitative research have been, or should be, abandoned. Today, such debates take place in multiple contexts of discourse in which the “quality” of qualitative research is understood and treated in very different ways.

  1. The continued globalization and interdisciplinary appeal of qualitative research has accelerated the diversification of existing frameworks, theories, methodologies and methods. We are encountering many innovative developments that originate within the “older” qualitative approaches, such as social constructionism, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, conversation analysis, phenomenology, hermeneutics, grounded theory methodology, and discourse analysis. In addition, today, many qualitative researchers transcend traditional boundaries and draw on a much broader theoretical canon when using and developing new qualitative methods, including critical approaches such as feminist, postcolonial and critical race theories, political economy frameworks, as well as postmodernism, poststructuralism and arts-based epistemologies. Moreover, collaboration between qualitative social scientists and scholars from discipline as diverse as the arts, design, computer sciences, medicine, and other health sciences have accelerated the development of “alternative” research methods. These developments lead to many new questions, such as: What does the new theoretical landscape of qualitative epistemologies and methodologies look like? How do various national and cultural contexts shape developments and debates of new qualitative frameworks? Finally, how is the “quality” of new qualitative research practices assessed across different disciplines and epistemological contexts?
  2. Over the past 20 years, qualitative research has been influenced by tremendous developments and expansions in technology and social media. Researchers increasingly use tools such as video-cameras, smart phones, and the Internet to collect data. A wide array of software packages has both reduced and increased the complexity of data collection and analysis. We must ask new questions, such as: How does the proliferation of new tools and technologies shape the practical and intellectual work of qualitative researchers? Which new social worlds and relationships have emerged, and how should they be examined and theorized qualitatively?
  • Funding mechanisms in the (social) sciences have also changed substantially, alongside institutional structures in the university. Today, in addition to public and non-profit funding bodies, researchers must turn to private and commercial institutions to acquire resources, some of which are very open toward qualitative approaches while others question their utility. New questions, such as the following, emerged: How do changes in funding and other institutional structures influence the theory and practice of qualitative research? How do the new funding and institutional landscapes vary by country, by region, and by discipline? What impacts do these changes have on the selection of research topics and on qualitative research ethics and responsibilities?
  • Lastly scientific research has increasingly come under pressure from politicians and policy makers, as well as from other influential experts, who have bluntly questioned the scholarly enterprise and confronted all scientific research with hostility and antagonism. This raises questions, such as: How do researchers who use qualitative theories, methodologies and methods respond to fundamental challenges of their (social) scientific expertise? How do they convince public audiences that their work raises and helps solve important questions?

Despite long-standing discussions about the quality of qualitative research, still no agreement has been reached about a catalogue of criteria that would serve to guarantee its value across the myriad contexts in which it is used today, similar to the classical, canonical standards that exist for quantitative scholars. In fact, we must broaden our understandings of what qualitative research is, and how it is practiced, while we continue to ask questions about its “quality.” The many issues and questions raised above may serve to re-invigorate discussions about the “Quality of Qualitative Research” in this FQS Debates, in alignment with current developments and concerns. As internal and external conditions for qualitative research practice have changed, a new engagement with the original issues, we hope, will invite new participants, raise new questions, and will lead to new insights within this worthwhile “Quality” debate. A reconfigured international FQS debate team eagerly awaits your submissions.

This is a Call without a deadline.

For questions, please contact the Section Editors: Franz Breuer, Paul Eisewicht, Margarethe Kusenbach, Jo Reichertz, Dirk vom Lehn, e-mail: deb_quality@qualitative-research.net

Special Issue ‘The Senses in Social Interaction’ edited by Will Gibson (@Willjimgibson) and Dirk vom Lehn (@dirkvl) published in Symbolic Interaction (@sociologylens) #sssi #emca #senses #interaction

Announcement, interaction, interactionism, Senses

Symbolic Interaction (@sijournal) has just published our Special Issue on ‘The Senses in Social Interaction’ (Vol.44(1)). The Table of Contents is below.

Will Gibson and Dirk vom Lehn – Introduction: The Senses in Social Interaction [Open Access] https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.539

Danielle Pillet-Shore – “When to Make the Sensory Social: Registering in Face‐to‐Face Openings” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.481 (with video abstract)

Giolo Fele and Ken Liberman – “Some Discovered Practices of Lay Coffee Drinkershttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.486

Lorenza Mondada – “Orchestrating Multi‐sensoriality in Tasting Sessions: Sensing Bodies, Normativity, and Languagehttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.472

Sally Wiggins and Leelo Keevallik – “Enacting Gustatory Pleasure on Behalf of Another: The Multimodal Coordination of Infant Tasting Practices” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.527

Francesca Astrid Salvadori and Giampietro Gobo – “Sensing the Bike: Creating a Collaborative Unerstanding of a Multi-Sensorial Experience in MotoGP Racinghttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.529

Brian Due – Distributed Perception: Co‐Operation between Sense‐Able, Actionable, and Accountable Semiotic Agents https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.538

Sylvie Grosjean, Frederik Matte and Isaac Nahon-Serfaty – “Sensory Ordering” in Nurses’ Clinical Decision‐Making: Making Visible Senses, Sensing, and “Sensory Work” in the Hospitalhttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.490

David Matthew Edmonds and Christian Greiffenhagen – “Configuring Prospective Sensations: Experimenters Preparing Participants for What They Might Feel” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.485

Eduardo de la Fuente and Michael James Walsh – “Framing Atmospheres: Goffman, Space, and Music in Everyday Lifehttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.506

Book Reviews

Brigitte Biehl – “Atmospheres always open to change” – Review of ‘Atmospheres and the Experiential World: Theory and Methods’ By Sumartojo, Shanti and Pink, Sarah ( Routledge, 2019) – https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.507

Don Everhart- “Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, and Intercorporeality” Review of ‘Intercorporeality: Emerging Socialities in Interaction’ edited by Christian Meyer, Juergen Streeck, and J. Scott Jordan (OUP, 2019) https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.523

Jessica S. Robles – “Contact: Pushing the Boundaries of Touch‐in‐Interaction” – Review of ‘Touch in Social Interaction: Touch, Language, and Body’ edited by Asta Cekaite and Lorenza Mondada (Routledge, 2019) https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.524

Jeffrey van den Scott – “Loud, Fast, and Hard: Changing Identities in a Musical Subculture” – Review of ‘Psychobilly: Subcultural Survival’ By Kimberly Kattari (Temple University Press, 2020) https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.522

James Fletcher – “Finding Order through Disorder: Dementia as a Reflection of Social Organization” – Review of ‘Forgetting Items: The Social Experience of Alzheimer’s Disease’ By Baptiste Brossard (Indiana University Press, 2019).

Chris Land – “An Oasis of Beer in the Desert of the Real?” – Review of ‘Vegas Brews: Craft Beer and the Birth of a Local Scene’ by Borer, Michael Ian (NYU, 2019)https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.512

Judson G. Everitt – “Emotions, Interactions, and Institutions in Preschool Teaching” – Review of ‘Between Teaching and Caring in the Preschool: Talk, Interaction, and the Preschool Teacher Identity‘ by John C. Pruit https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.487

Philippe Sormani – “Reflexive Ethnography as “Data Science”? A Sociological Contribution to Praxeology” – Review of ‘Daten‐Karrieren und epistemische Materialität: Eine wissenschaftssoziologische Studie zur methodologischen Praxis der Ethnografie By Meier zu Verl, Christian ( J. B. Metzler Verlag, 2018) https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.488

Noreen M. Sugrue – “Evolutionary Explanation Meets Social Reality” – Review of ‘Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society’ by Nicolas Christakis (Little Brown Spark, 2019). https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.483

Articles for Special Issue on ‘The Senses in Social Interaction’ published on Early View of Symbolic Interaction (@sijournal) #sssi #emca #senses #sociology cc @TweetsEmca @sociologylens

Announcement, Special Issue, Symbolic Interaction

About a year ago, Symbolic Interaction published a Call for Papers for a Special Issue on ‘The Senses in Social Interaction’ that I co-edit with Will Gibson (UCL). Once published, probably in 2021, the Special Issue will explore the senses as interactional phenomena. Symbolic Interaction has recently begun to publish some of the articles on Early View:

Will Gibson and Dirk vom Lehn – Introduction: The Senses in Social Interaction [Open Access] https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.539

Eduardo de la Fuente and Michael James Walsh – “Framing Atmospheres: Goffman, Space, and Music in Everyday Lifehttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.506

Giolo Fele and Ken Liberman – “Some Discovered Practices of Lay Coffee Drinkershttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.486

Brian Due – Distributed Perception: Co‐Operation between Sense‐Able, Actionable, and Accountable Semiotic Agents https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.538

Lorenza Mondada – “Orchestrating Multi‐sensoriality in Tasting Sessions: Sensing Bodies, Normativity, and Languagehttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.472

Sally Wiggins and Leelo Keevallik – “Enacting Gustatory Pleasure on Behalf of Another: The Multimodal Coordination of Infant Tasting Practices” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.527

Danielle Pillet-Shore – “When to Make the Sensory Social: Registering in Face‐to‐Face Openings” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.481 (with video abstract)

Francesca Astrid Salvadori and Giampietro Gobo – “Sensing the Bike: Creating a Collaborative Unerstanding of a Multi-Sensorial Experience in MotoGP Racinghttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.529

David Matthew Edmonds and Christian Greiffenhagen – “Configuring Prospective Sensations: Experimenters Preparing Participants for What They Might Feel” https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.485

Sylvie Grosjean, Frederik Matte and Isaac Nahon-Serfaty – “Sensory Ordering” in Nurses’ Clinical Decision‐Making: Making Visible Senses, Sensing, and “Sensory Work” in the Hospitalhttps://doi.org/10.1002/symb.490

Book Reviews

Brigitte Biehl – “Atmospheres always open to change” – Review of ‘Atmospheres and the Experiential World: Theory and Methods’ By Sumartojo, Shanti and Pink, Sarah ( Routledge, 2019) – https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.507

Chis Land – “An Oasis of Beer in the Desert of the Real?” – Review of ‘Vegas Brews: Craft Beer and the Birth of a Local Scene’ by Borer, Michael Ian (NYU, 2019)https://doi.org/10.1002/symb.512

more reviews to be added.

“The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke #TOC #museums #technology #design #digitalization #interactivity

Announcement, Books, exhibitions, interaction, interactivity, interactivity, museums, Museums, Technology, Technology, visitors

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation #technology 

The publication of “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke has been announced for November 15th, 2019. The book includes interviews by Seb Chan (ACMI), Dave Patten (Science Museum London), Rory Hyde (Victoria & Albert Museum, London), and Keir Winesmith (SFMOMA) as well as chapters covering four broad themes: “THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR”, “ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE”, “DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE”, and “LOCATING IN PLACE”.

More information about the Handbook can be accessed on the publisher’s website by clicking the image below (apologies for the steep price!).

41Au7tyvoTL GLAM 

New Practices in Digital Media design in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Steven Cooke, Dirk vom Lehn
 

FRAMING INTERVIEWS

Interview with Seb Chan, ACMI Seb Chan, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
Interview with Dave Patten, Science Museum London David Patten, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Rory Hyde, V&A Museum Rory Hyde, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Keir Winesmith, SFMOMA Keir Winesmith, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
 

PART 1. THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR

Digitizations, users and curatorial agency within complex global machinic jurisdictions Fiona Cameron
The distributed museum: the flight of cultural authority and the multiple times and spaces of the art museum Andrew Dewdney
The distributed museum is already here–it’s just not very evenly distributed Ed Rodley
Speculative Collections and the Emancipatory Library Bethany Nowviskie
Chinese Museums’ Digital Heritage Profile: An Evaluation of Digital Technology Adoption in Cultural Heritage Institutions Andrew White and Eugene Ch’ng
Hacking heritage: understanding the limits of online access Tim Sherratt
From Planned Oblivion to Digital Exposition: The Digital Museum of Afro-Brazilian Heritage Livio Sansone
Shared  Digital  Experiences Supporting  Collaborative    Meaning-Making  at  Heritage  Sites Sara  Perry,  Maria  Roussou,  Sophia  S.  Mirashrafi,  Akrivi  Katifori,  and  Sierra  McKinney
 

PART 2. ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE

Neither A Beginning Nor An End: Applying An Ethics of Care to Digitizing Archival Collections in South Asia Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor
Digital Archives in Africa and the Endangered Archives Programme Graeme Counsel
The Alan Vaughan-Richards Archive: recovering tropical modernism in Lagos. Ola Uduku
Museum Crowdsourcing—Detecting the Limits: eMunch.no and the Digitisation of Letters Addressed to Edvard Munch Joanna Iranowska
Digital and hybrid archives: a case study of the William J Mitchell collection Thomas Kvan, Peter Neish and Naomi Mullumby
Preserving Chinese Shadow Puppetry Culture Through Digitisation Tin-Kai Chen
Be Engaged: Facilitating Creative Re-use at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Gregory Markus, Maarten Brinkerink, Brigitte Jansen
Cultural Antinomies, Creative Complicities: Agan Harahap’s Digital Hoaxes Alexandra Moschovi and Alexander Supartono
 

PART 3. DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE

On Virtual Auras: The Cultural Heritage Object in the Age of 3D Digital Reproduction John Hindmarch, Melissa Terras and Steve Robson
Configuring Slow Technology Through Social and Embodied Interaction: Making Time for Reflection in Augmented Reality Museum Experiences with Young Visitors Areti Galani and Rachel Clarke
Exhibition Design and Professional Theories: the Development of an Astronomy Exhibition Dirk vom Lehn, Kate Sang, Richard Glassborow and Louise King
Meeting the Challenge of the Immoveable: Experiencing Mogao Grottoes Cave 45 With Immersive Technology Jeffrey Levin, Robert, Checchi, Lori Wong, Garson Yu and Edwin Baker
Immersive Engagement: Designing and Testing a Virtual Indian Residential School Exhibition Adam Muller
Hemispheres: transdisciplinary architectures and museum-university collaboration Sarah Kenderdine
Human-Centred Design in Digital Media Indigo Hanlee
Unlocking the Glass Case Peter Higgins
The law of feeling: experiments in a Yolngu museology Paul Gurrumuruway and Jennifer Deger
Henry VR: designing affect-oriented virtual reality exhibitions for art museums Paula Dredge, Anne Gerard-Austin, Simon Ives and Andrew Yip
Website as publishing platform Tim Jones and David Simpson
From Shelf to Web: First Reflections on the O’Donnell Marginalia Project Julia Kuehns
Interpreting the Future Tony Holzner
 

PART 4. LOCATING IN PLACE

What Could Have Bean? A Digital Construction of Charles Bean’s Australian War Memorial Anthea Gunn
Succession: A Generative Approach to Digital Collections Mitchell Whitelaw
Rephotography and the Situating of Then-and-Now Hannah Lewi and Andrew Murray
Hospicio Cabañas: Seeing World Heritage Through Google’s Eyes Cristina Garduno Freeman
The Experience of Using Digital Walking Tours to Explore Urban Histories Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, Hannah Lewi, Katie Best and Dora Constantinidis
Traces—Olion: Creating a Bilingual ‘Subtlemob’ for National Museum Wales Sara Huws, Alison John, Jenny Kidd
Investigating ‘Ordinary’ Landscapes: Using Visual Research Methods to Understand Heritage Digital Technologies and Sense of Place Steven Cooke and Dora Constantinidis
Massive Digital Community Archives in Colombia: An International Partnership Towards Peace Diego Merizalde and Jon Voss
Mapping an Archive of Emotions: Place, Memory and the Affective Histories of Perth’s Riverscape Alicia Marchant

Afterword

Andrea Witcomb

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation

Special Issue of Human Studies devoted to ‘Harold Garfinkel: Studies in Ethnomethodology’

Announcement, Ethnomethodology, Uncategorized

Almost exactly 2 years ago Christian Meyer and colleagues organized a conference to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of Harold Garfinkel’s Studies in Ethnomethodology. A link to information about the 2017 conference is HERE.

Human Studies has just been published Special Issue devoted to the Studies anniversary that can be accessed HERE and on the image below.

Screen Shot 2019-10-31 at 6.09.25 PM

Forthcoming “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke #museums #technology #design #digitalization #interactivity

Announcement, book, interaction, interactivity, museums, Museums, Technology

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation #technology 

The publication of “The Routledge International Handbook of New Digital Practices in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites” edited by Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, & Steve Cooke has been announced for November 15th, 2019. The book includes interviews by Seb Chan (ACMI), Dave Patten (Science Museum London), Rory Hyde (Victoria & Albert Museum, London), and Keir Winesmith (SFMOMA) as well as chapters covering four broad themes: “THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR”, “ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE”, “DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE”, and “LOCATING IN PLACE”.

More information about the Handbook can be accessed on the publisher’s website by clicking the image below (apologies for the steep price!).

41Au7tyvoTL

New Practices in Digital Media design in Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums and Heritage Sites Hannah Lewi, Wally Smith, Steven Cooke, Dirk vom Lehn
 

FRAMING INTERVIEWS

Interview with Seb Chan, ACMI Seb Chan, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
Interview with Dave Patten, Science Museum London David Patten, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Rory Hyde, V&A Museum Rory Hyde, Dirk vom Lehn and Wally Smith
Interview with Keir Winesmith, SFMOMA Keir Winesmith, Hannah Lewi and Wally Smith
 

PART 1. THE EMERGING GLOBAL DIGITAL GLAM SECTOR

Digitizations, users and curatorial agency within complex global machinic jurisdictions Fiona Cameron
The distributed museum: the flight of cultural authority and the multiple times and spaces of the art museum Andrew Dewdney
The distributed museum is already here–it’s just not very evenly distributed Ed Rodley
Speculative Collections and the Emancipatory Library Bethany Nowviskie
Chinese Museums’ Digital Heritage Profile: An Evaluation of Digital Technology Adoption in Cultural Heritage Institutions Andrew White and Eugene Ch’ng
Hacking heritage: understanding the limits of online access Tim Sherratt
From Planned Oblivion to Digital Exposition: The Digital Museum of Afro-Brazilian Heritage Livio Sansone
Shared  Digital  Experiences Supporting  Collaborative    Meaning-Making  at  Heritage  Sites Sara  Perry,  Maria  Roussou,  Sophia  S.  Mirashrafi,  Akrivi  Katifori,  and  Sierra  McKinney
 

PART 2. ANIMATING THE ARCHIVE

Neither A Beginning Nor An End: Applying An Ethics of Care to Digitizing Archival Collections in South Asia Michelle Caswell and Marika Cifor
Digital Archives in Africa and the Endangered Archives Programme Graeme Counsel
The Alan Vaughan-Richards Archive: recovering tropical modernism in Lagos. Ola Uduku
Museum Crowdsourcing—Detecting the Limits: eMunch.no and the Digitisation of Letters Addressed to Edvard Munch Joanna Iranowska
Digital and hybrid archives: a case study of the William J Mitchell collection Thomas Kvan, Peter Neish and Naomi Mullumby
Preserving Chinese Shadow Puppetry Culture Through Digitisation Tin-Kai Chen
Be Engaged: Facilitating Creative Re-use at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision Gregory Markus, Maarten Brinkerink, Brigitte Jansen
Cultural Antinomies, Creative Complicities: Agan Harahap’s Digital Hoaxes Alexandra Moschovi and Alexander Supartono
 

PART 3. DESIGNING ENGAGED EXPERIENCE

On Virtual Auras: The Cultural Heritage Object in the Age of 3D Digital Reproduction John Hindmarch, Melissa Terras and Steve Robson
Configuring Slow Technology Through Social and Embodied Interaction: Making Time for Reflection in Augmented Reality Museum Experiences with Young Visitors Areti Galani and Rachel Clarke
Exhibition Design and Professional Theories: the Development of an Astronomy Exhibition Dirk vom Lehn, Kate Sang, Richard Glassborow and Louise King
Meeting the Challenge of the Immoveable: Experiencing Mogao Grottoes Cave 45 With Immersive Technology Jeffrey Levin, Robert, Checchi, Lori Wong, Garson Yu and Edwin Baker
Immersive Engagement: Designing and Testing a Virtual Indian Residential School Exhibition Adam Muller
Hemispheres: transdisciplinary architectures and museum-university collaboration Sarah Kenderdine
Human-Centred Design in Digital Media Indigo Hanlee
Unlocking the Glass Case Peter Higgins
The law of feeling: experiments in a Yolngu museology Paul Gurrumuruway and Jennifer Deger
Henry VR: designing affect-oriented virtual reality exhibitions for art museums Paula Dredge, Anne Gerard-Austin, Simon Ives and Andrew Yip
Website as publishing platform Tim Jones and David Simpson
From Shelf to Web: First Reflections on the O’Donnell Marginalia Project Julia Kuehns
Interpreting the Future Tony Holzner
 

PART 4. LOCATING IN PLACE

What Could Have Bean? A Digital Construction of Charles Bean’s Australian War Memorial Anthea Gunn
Succession: A Generative Approach to Digital Collections Mitchell Whitelaw
Rephotography and the Situating of Then-and-Now Hannah Lewi and Andrew Murray
Hospicio Cabañas: Seeing World Heritage Through Google’s Eyes Cristina Garduno Freeman
The Experience of Using Digital Walking Tours to Explore Urban Histories Wally Smith, Dirk vom Lehn, Hannah Lewi, Katie Best and Dora Constantinidis
Traces—Olion: Creating a Bilingual ‘Subtlemob’ for National Museum Wales Sara Huws, Alison John, Jenny Kidd
Investigating ‘Ordinary’ Landscapes: Using Visual Research Methods to Understand Heritage Digital Technologies and Sense of Place Steven Cooke and Dora Constantinidis
Massive Digital Community Archives in Colombia: An International Partnership Towards Peace Diego Merizalde and Jon Voss
Mapping an Archive of Emotions: Place, Memory and the Affective Histories of Perth’s Riverscape Alicia Marchant
 

Afterword

 

Andrea Witcomb

 

 

#digitalization #experience #interaction #interactivity #museums #participation

Just out – “Making Space for Art: A Spatial Perspective of Disruptive and Defensive Institutional Work in Venezuela’s Art World” Academy of Management Journal (AMJ) by Victoria Rodner, Thomas Roulet, Finola Kerrigan and Dirk vom Lehn

Announcement, museums, sociology

We have just published an article based on Victoria Rodner’s excellent PhD thesis in the Academy of Management Journal (AMJ). Drawing on longitudinal ethnographic and interview data the article explore how space is leveraged in institutional work, our study foregrounds the socio-political nature of space, building on and expanding the theorization of Lefebvre.

The article can be downloaded by clicking the link below:

“Making Space for Art: A Spatial Perspective of Disruptive and Defensive Institutional Work in Venezuela’s Art World”

by Victoria Rodner (@VictoriaLRodner), Thomas Roulet (@thomroulet), Finola Kerrigan (@finolak) and Dirk vom Lehn (@dirkvl)

Abstract

The physical and material aspects of space, such as geographical distance or boundaries, have social and symbolic consequences that impact how people influence and are influenced by institutions. Social actors can however contest how space is conceived, perceived and lived, thus making space a crucial lever in the disruption and defense of institutions. However, we lack understanding of the spatial aspects of such institutional struggles. In exploring how space is leveraged in institutional work, our study foregrounds the socio-political nature of space, building on and expanding the theorization of Lefebvre. We draw on an in-depth longitudinal analysis of the material, social and symbolic aspects of the spatial dimensions of disruptive and defensive institutional work over the past twenty years in Venezuela’s art world. Following the Bolivarian Revolution in the late 1990s, the incoming government transformed the organization of the national cultural landscape, resulting in a prolonged period of institutional disruption and defense. We demonstrate that actors use the material, social, and symbolic dimensions of space to challenge and maintain their key values and practices, and that those three dimensions are intertwined.

Keywords

Institutional theory, Emerging economies, Policy environment, International Management, Ethnography, Interviews

https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2016.1030

Screen Shot 2019-09-05 at 1.26.41 PM